Waterfalls of Grace and Truth (Reflection)

WaterfallIn both politics and religion (and certainly the physical sciences, but not just these) truth is seen as the arbiter between good and bad, right and wrong, justice and injustice, etc. Yet, shouldn’t we admit that truth in both politics and religion is very fragile. Though objective truth is pursued and often claimed by religious doctrinaires or political pundits, history has shown that it has rarely been achieved. The belief in objective truth, in theory, may be quite reasonable, but humanity’s ability to grasp it is fleeting. Thus, claiming that the truth is the only important thing in politics or religion could easily turn a noble person into a tyrant. When objective truth is claimed in politics or religion, even the meekest of persons can be directly or indirectly a party to all kinds of immoral acts of violence and oppression.

One of my favorite verses about God in Christ says, “And then God became human … full of grace and truth” (Jn 1:14). The essence of God is a full measure of both truth and grace. For humanity to evolve into empathetic beings that emulate God, the dialectical antithesis of one truth cannot be another truth, but instead must be grace. Do we really believe that we can synthesize opposing truths into greater truths? No, spiritual and material evolution require a revolutionary synthesis of truth and grace. Without grace, truth does not set people free but instead enslaves and oppresses them, while damning the person wielding truth as a weapon over others.

There is a great story told by Mark Cobb as remembered by John Swinton which exemplifies what I am trying to convey: “Imagine yourself walking through a deep, dense wood. You are surrounded by beautiful, luscious foliage; the constantly changing aromas of the rich shrubbery makes your head swirl. Suddenly, you reach a clearing. Right in the center of the clearing is a beautiful stream headed up by a magnificent waterfall. You stand and watch in awe at the mystery and wonder of the waterfall. Multiple rainbows dance across the glistening surface of the water. The sound of the water, the taste of the spray, the sight of the magnificence, and the power of the waterfall touches you in inexpressible places and brings you into contact with a dimension of experience which you can’t quite articulate. Eventually, your gaze of wonder begins to change as your curious side clicks into action: ‘What is this thing called a waterfall? ‘What is it made of?’ ‘Why does it have such an effect on me?’  “So, you pick up a bucket and scoop some of the water from the falls. You look into the bucket, but something has changed. The water is technically the same substance in each setting: H2O. It remains a vital constituent of your life; you need it to live and without it you will perish. Yet, something has been lost in the movement from the waterfall to the bucket. In your attempts to break it down, analyze, and explain what it really is, the mystery and awe of the waterfall is left behind.”[i]

What is the truth of H2O, the beautiful waterfall or the life-giving waters in the bucket?

For the sake of our own well-being and the well-being of other humans and the cosmos, could we each take a step back from all that we think we know to be factual about politics and/or religion and admit that without a full measure of grace we are the problem in our world and not the solution?

Grace is the waterfall; the water-bucket is the truth. We don’t have to choose truth over grace, but we can choose to hold both in glorious tension.

© Paul Dordal, 2018

[i] John Swinton, “Healthcare spirituality: a question of knowledge” in the Oxford Textbook of Spirituality in Healthcare. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p99.

Faith is the Victory (Reflection)

Cornelia PetreaI don’t “believe” in god! To believe in god is to construct a thing, an object. It is to conceptualize an idea and give it a fixed, rigid shape. To believe in god is imaginary; it is childish magical thinking. The god that most people believe in is the god they created or had created for them by another, therefore not the God that created them. Our creeds and religions force feed us a patriarchal notion of god, which unfortunately cannot deepen a connection to God, but only further abstracts the object/idol of our own making.

So, how can I claim to be a Christian and not believe in god. Surely, I must have some belief. No, I do not nor do I want to “believe” in god in that way.

I am, however, distinguishing faith from belief. Faith is the victory, as the old gospel hymn goes. Faith is the actual experience of God. Faith is the know-ing of God (John 17:3), not the thought or idea of god. Faith is the concretizing of the abstract, the process of real-izing the Spirit of God that is within and without. “The Spirit joins with our spirits to assure us of our participation with God” (Romans 8:16).

So, faith does come by “hearing” the Word, even the Christ (John 6:68). It is not a word or words, but the Word or Logos. Faith comes by “hearing” the unconstructed Spirit of God—the real God which is beyond the grasp of language and thought.

Faith is the participation of Christ and our openness to Christ’s active participation in our lives.

Faith is the penetrating energy of Love.

Faith inspires compassionate action on behalf of God’s creation.

It is the God of faith that ought to be obeyed and followed: The God of the Kin-dom.

 

© Paul Dordal, 2018